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at the top of the show, we asked why you are awake. your answers? >> who knew jim has legs. so nice to see him standing in the studio. kind of long, too, right. am i short? just giggles in here. next. >> kind of a diverse viewership, david in new orleans, i run an international logistics business and sean in seattle trying to wait for whiskey to wear off. >> we accept all. after last week at the bar, some
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call me bloody mary bill. it works after a long night with the whiskey. "morning joe" starts right now. >> according to government run news outlets, last week the iranian government launched a live monkey into launched a live monkey into space. there's been no independent confirmati confirmation which means it probably didn't happen. they released a photo, this is the alleged iranian space monkey. based on the photo, i'm guessing he didn't volunteer for the mission. and i'd like to see them hook the iranian space monkey with the ikea sweater monkey. wouldn't they make a great couple. they said he flew into space and came back alive and well and even threw him a parade when he got back. there's the space monkey.
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adorable when he banks his little sim balls together. very cute. >> good morning from los angeles, tuesday, january 29th. with us on set from new york, willie geist, mike barnicle, senior political editor and white house correspondent for the "huffington post," sam stein, former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner and in washington, washington anchor for bbc world news america, katty kay. so glad to have you with us this morning. willie geist, an awful lot to talk about. you almost wanted to hear don pardo say, tell them what you want. hillary gets parting gifts, a 60 minutes send-off by the president of the united states. yesterday, lots of cash. >> yeah. looks like the obama campaign is going to retire her debt. according to bloomberg business week's josh green, a group of
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obama donors deciding to pay off the 2008 campaign debt she ran up which came to 250,000 bucks of last year. 120 people cut checks to pay off her bills. we will get into that story a little bit. put that something with the "60 minutes" view, a nice parting package for hillary clinton. >> no doubt about it. also outside washington, looks like gridlock finally getting set aside for a comprehensive immigration bill. we'll still see whether it passes or not. you had a lot of people in 2007 saying democrats and republicans had come together and then it was sidetracked. not so sure if that will happen again. certainly the republicans and president feeling like they may get a deal on immigration. >> yeah. the moment feels a little bit different. john mccain said on sunday we have to do something about the latino vote. president obama won 71% in the election a few months ago.
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he said today, the president is to unveil his own plan for immigration reform and will do that in las vegas. in nevada, a state where hispanicses makes.27% of the population, comes a day after a bipartisan group of eight senators reached a compromise how to move forward with comprehensive immigration reform. included in that bill, a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented workers currently in this country. >> other bipartisan groups and senators have stood in the same spot before trumpeting similar proposals, but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there's more political risk opposing immigration reform than supporting it. >> the what's going on now is unacceptable. in reality, what's been created is a de facto amnesty. we have been too content for too
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long to allow individuals to mow our lawn, serve our food, clean our homes and even watch our children while not affording them any of the benefits that make our country so great. >> a few of the bullet points, under the framework, those seeking citizenship would be required to register with the federal government, settle debts with the government including fines and back taxes, undergo a background check and learn english and american civics. yesterday, marco rubio in florida sought to win over conservatives opposed to any deal with threats of amnesty. >> there are over 11 million workers undocumented. that's not something any wanted to see happen. it is what has happened. we have an obligation and need to address the reality of the situation we face. i think today is an important first step in what's going to be a significant complicated
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journey. the issue of immigration is not a simple one. we have the opportunity to do it right and if we do, i think we'll do a tremendous service to our country. snow jo . >> joe, remains to be seen how far this gets but you see john mccain and lindsey graham talking about what they're talking about in terms of a bill that even hints at amnesty. >> no doubt about it, things have changed in the last five years. there will still be conservatives in the house who want to be assured by marco rubio and john mccain and any conservative that supports this bill that won't be a repeat of 1996, that was an out-right amnesty bill, it really didn't look for, didn't plan for, to make sure you didn't continue a steady stream of illegal immigrants into the country.
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already they're looking back, mike barnicle, at 1986, ronald reagan, again, and congress passing a bill that only caused more problems in the future. but i think they feel this time they will get it right. >> they better get it right. i don't know if there's a way for chuck schumer or harry reid to make marco rubio the point person and would be the success of this bill if he were to play a daily role in the senate. the problem is, as you alluded to, what happens when this bill goes over to the house of representatives. i would think given the composition of the house and what's gone on within elements of the house republican party, someone has to sit down with them and ask the question, don't you think, katty, are you interested, is the republican party interested in carrying a national election within the next 80 years.
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>> that's the polisplit they hao look at. if mitt romney had won a share of hispanic votes george bush got back in 2004 we'd be looking at president romney right now. the republican party has to decide, are we going to try go for the presidential elections, in which case we have to do better with the hispanic vote and means frankly we have to do immigration reform or are you a house republican member from a seat in south carolina and you're worried about who is going to run against you in a primary from the right if you support and sign up for immigration reform. you know that primary challenge will come from somebody more conservative than you, who will say i know constituents don't like immigration reform and hate amnesty in a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants and i will counter you in your primary challenge. that's the dynamic at play for house republicans. if they're looking at their own seat and actually the party as a
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whole, if we had a lot more conservative people elected in those primaries, the house republican party looks more conservative as well. >> this looks like the first obvious instance gerrymandering will have a legislative effect. >> huge. >> this is totally different district by district than state by state. i think marco rubio has his work cut out because he is the point person to sell this to conservative house caucus and conservative radio. he will be doing hits with rush limbaugh, the point person talking to that universe. what he's telling them is a package that say this is amnesty but we will have strenuous and onerous requirements before hand and a system set up where we ensure the border is set up before you go there. >> i like the way you describe limbaugh's audience as that universe. was being generous. >> i don't know if this bill will go through for all the
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reasons you guys have been talking about. it gets closer than anything we've seen before, first, because the republicans should need something like this and it does address their concerns, particularly you just alluded to, sam, the principle the border has to be made secure before you start dealing with these people and one question joe mentioned what happened in the '80s you stop this flow and don't have this problem again. the right wing of the republicans can say what they will say. everybody knows in their heart of hearts we're not going to deport 11 or 12 million illegal immigrants, split up families, it's not going to happen. the question is, what is the path and how do you deal with it in a way both sides are comfortable and not rewarding people with bad behavior and sneaking in the country. >> let's address the liberal concern, they're worried the southwestern attorney generals are border hawks and have a de
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facto sign-off whether this goes through. there's no detail as to what the sequencing is. the border is secure, let's go with the amnesty part of it. there's real concern i'm hearing from progressives, we don't want the border to go through and none of the other. >> and president obama himself, who believes those are too strenuous. >> if the "wall street journal" opinion page is any indication, they're saying this morning this is a promising senate framework and it ought to be looked at very seriously. >> it will be interesting to see what the president says about another aspect of immigration, critical, when you think about it, a lot of people don't think about it. the guest worker aspect. come into this country, work for a period of time and stay illegally. if they go back home, they can't come back in. dealing with that is a critical component. >> that's a part of it. this economy cannot function
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without people to do the jobs americans won't do. >> quickly, with that said, we would be fooling ourselves this morning if we didn't look at this immigration debate and understand there might not be a tinge of the gun debate involved where you have people in new york and people in washington and people at the networks and national newspapers all supporting this and even a lot of the leaders inside washington d.c. where the rest of america is a bit more wary and skeptical. if you don't believe that, go to the conservative websites, the national review, go to several others. the "wall street journal" says it is a promising framework and i think it is. there are a lot of conservative outlets that have yet to weigh in on this aggressively. they will start that now. the phone calls will start the congressional offices and just like the gun debate, you will
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have people energized who want this bill killed and congress will get 10-1 calls against this immigration bill and they have to make this decision just like they have to make a decision on background checks, just like they have to make the decision on assault weapons and just like they have to make the decision on high capacity magazines. do they want to speak to a certain constituency that will keep them in the minority national party forever or do they want to take a step forward? we'll see. >> you're already starting to see the protests out of the house of representatives, where the real challenge is. secretary of state hillary clinton getting quite the going away gift from the obama team. josh green reporting a group of obama donors decided to pay off the remainder of her 2008 campaign debt that came to 250 grand as of last year. 120 different people cut checks to pay off those bills. hillary clinton's campaign,
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which was never officially shut down, now has a surplus of about $200,000 in the bank. should clinton decide to run in 2016, there's already a super pac supporting her, ready for hillary, it's called, already garnering nearly 50,000 twitter followers. >> i'm sure steve rattner set up that account yesterday. >> he's ready. >> have you given money yet, steve rattner, to hillary's super pac? >> i have not. we would. my wife and i were her second biggest fund-raisers in 2008 and we're huge fans and she is certainly the elephant in the room when it comes to 2016. >> the measure of the super pac's strength now is it twitter followers. >> who are those 50,000 people. >> we should ask you, steve, but your wife, maureen, is hillary going to run? what does maureen say? >> the honest answer is we don't
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know. i think when she gets some rest and sleeps off the last four years and looks around says inned, inned -- i'm still really energetic and strong and one of the most popular politicians in the country, hard that she doesn't give this more thought. >> what does joe biden say about this and something said about the president given a tacid endorse document hillary clinton as joe biden steamed somewhere in his office. >> he had to love that 60th minute interview. the reality is it depends on hillary clinton, if she decides in two years or four years time s she's had enough rest and comes to the realization she will never be a normal person who can walk down the street by herself. she will always be hillary clinton and why not throw her hat in the ring and not a private individual that can go for private life and may as well
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go for the presidency. if she makes that decision, joe biden has to back off. he won't be able to run if she is running. he's in a difficult position and has to sit and wait while she takes the rest she needs to take after this grueling secretary of state and then decide does she want to go for the presidency without this brutal campaign she had to go through in 2008 because no serious democrat will run against her or feel she does want to take back as much of a private life she can do. >> sam stein, we just have to remember back to 2006 and 2007, when hillary clinton was just as much the 800 pound elephant in the room, the giant that strode in, whatever you wanted to call it, she was the dominant force of the democratic party and nobody believed, myself
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included, that anybody could rise up to beat her. nobody believed that. we will see that for the next couple of years. are we making the same mistake we made before? >> it gives me cold sweats we're talking 2016 at this juncture. >> come on, sam. >> hold on. we're not talking about 2016, we're talking about 2013 and how joe biden moves going forward and what barack obama is doing. barack obama and his administration are making decision decisions where to put him out there for reasons i'm not talking about 2016, this will shape the direction of the democratic party the next four years and shape the president's relationship with the vice president. everything comes out of -- the second a lame duck president is elected in 2012, everybody starts looking at 2016 in washington. this is not a parlor game. this affects what goes on in washington d.c., what bills are passed, what alliances are made, how the city operates and
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functions over the next four years. >> this is why i think we will keep talking about this two years. the administration is invested in having biden still be perceived as a presidential possibility. it gives him more power, allows people to conceive of him as being someone of influence who will matter in a couple years time. as soon as it becomes clear, if it becomes clear joe biden will not be a candidate, he instantly loses that. they're invested in not having this conversation for a year. with respect to joe's first question about hillary in 2006 and circa 2006 we all thought she was this unbeatable giant, i think there's the same probability of us ov overemphasizing her strengths here. you get a lot more sympathetic coverage you're secretary of state, you're traveling the world, you don't have to be at the epicenter of hot political debates over health care, deficit reduction and you don't have to take these positions. she's benefitted from that. at the same time, she has an
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immense amount of experience that makes her an obvious candidate. >> she was taken down in 2006 and 28th not by a republican but barack obama. >> there is no barack obama at the moment. let's not make too many assumptions. in 1992, nobody wanted to run against george bush in the primary because they thought he was unbeatable. i think somebody will take her hon on if she runs. i think the white house and biden has a confluence of interest and the white house doesn't want to see biden lose his stature and biden doesn't want to lose his stature. biden wants to run and make himself presidential. >> i can't really look forward to 2016 because i can't even look past tomorrow. tomorrow's show, seriously, it is -- i always joke, it's like night of the thousand stars. look at this. willie, look, the mt. rushmore of whatever it is the mt.
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rushmore of. al gore and bill gates will be on tomorrow. we're looking forward to that. also, coming up today, we're talking to senators john mccain and chuck schumer about their proposals on immigration reform and whether they really think this time is different than last time and former senate majority leader, all around great guy, tom daschle and mike van deltei and bill karins will be here to tell us about their hunting trip. outbreak and possible tornadoes for arkansas and louisiana and maybe tennessee. let me break it down for you. we're waking up at 5:00 a.m. in oklahoma. thunderstorms erupting to the west side of oklahoma city. chance of tornadoes, damage until about noon today. this is just the beginning of a
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long 48 hours tracking storms from oklahoma to texas all the way to carolina and georgia this time tomorrow and tomorrow afternoon. this is the setup, incredible. a very late march severe weather. it is 66 degrees, already record high in kansas city to start your morning. 22 in denver. you have the cold air and moisture. the area of red is a concern, talking the state of arkansas towards memphis and northern louisiana. on wednesday, all of these storms continue to push to the east coast. not worried about tornadoes in georgia and carolinas, a lot of damaging wind and trees down on houses and cars and a lot of cleanup by the time we get to thursday. today's forecast, record warmth in the middle of the country and dangerous thunderstorms and possible tornadoes late this afternoon or evening in arkansas. if you have friends in that area, arkansas to memphis,
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shreveport, make sure they know they're under threat when they go to bed. tornadoes typically turn out to be deadly. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. resources they need. bright students are getting lost in the shuffle. and administration's work gets more complex every year. when you look at these issues, do you see problems or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away...
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allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. due remember that show, "the morni monkees," back in the day? i did go for it. thanks, bob. a car plunged into a frozen pond with two people in it. >> that was -- willie, that was just awkward.
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you've got be careful when you're driving down the teleprompter road and make a sharp right hand turn. >> maybe a look away or paper shuffle or something, give it a beat. >> that's awful! >> a tough turn. put that on the producers. that's a tough turn there. >> that was. >> let's see how you do this one, joe. there it is. there you go. >> okay. boy scouts may welcome gays. that's "usa today." willie. what do we have in the "new york times"? >> the "new york times" is considering deploying spy drones in north africa to ramp up to vert operations for rad cap groups and factions and would be
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used for surveillance. it is 3,000 miles away from mali where france is currently in a fight with al qaeda. yahoo! executive marissa mayer has helped her company exceed expectations. they recruited top talent that improved employee morale by offering free food in the cafeteria and she also had a baby in that time because she had nothing else to do. yahoo!'s stock reached a four year high in after-hours trading. great news. the "miami herald" funeral is show iing people killed in a nightclub fire and the investigation begins and witnesses described the scene as total chaos and the band on stage lit pyrotechnics and the
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club had no sprinklers or firearms and exit blocked for some time by bouncers who didn't know what was going on as it all begins. joining us with the political playbook, chief correspondent, mike allen from new york. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> what brings you to our fair city. >> see how the big city folk live. chaotic, expensive. >> free starbucks. >> cow town, washington down there. let's pick up this discussion, bipartisan effort yesterday. you guys are reporting president obama is going to have some qualms at least with it in his speech today in las vegas. >> he is. there's a huge difference between the senate plan and president's plan. it could be a poison pill. the president, instead of having people wait until the borders are secure to have a pathway to citizenship, that he doesn't
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want to leave them in limbo. under the senate plan, there's 11 million illegals eligible for green cards only after the borders are secured. the president wants to do it at the same time. >> throw in a reality check how quickly this will happen. in the senate, no doubt bipartisanship. in the house huge resistance to this. we're only six months removed from the presidential nominee saying these illegal immigrants should self-deport and that was popular inside the republican party. >> we're two months from that same nominee going down the tubes. >> sure. that does not change what a rank and file conservative republican thinks about immigration. you couldn't even touch this issue two years ago. >> it's so much different and why we have senator marco rubio trying to turn down the heat. he's been on a tour of talk shows and today will do rush limbaugh and mark levine,
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another conservative talk show. >> and what the president was going to propose today and the senate was talking about, the 11 million. >> mike is right, there is a sequence you have to do border security first or not. the interesting thing is mccain and rubio did not want to be ov overshadowed by the president and forced the group to make the announcement before his and it looks like senate rubio and mccain plan before obama plan. everybody knows the pathway to citizenship is the toughfy, the most difficult component of getting comprehensive reform and seems like general principles everyone is talking about everyone agrees are the most doable. you get to the specifics of it. at the end of the day saying some people, probably most people who broke the law, came here illegally and took jobs most americans might have can stay here.
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probably the right thing to do and the most difficult. think about how easy it is to demagogue that and in the past. >> jim is right. this does feel like a moment for the republican party but inside the house, republicans face constituents who want no part of this. >> i wanted to say to jim and mike, is there any time marco rubio goes on conservative talk sh shows, anything he can say about the proposals that will change those minds, make more conservative elements opposed to this, particularly the path to citizenship, come on board with it. >> he's doing it, surprising. sean hannity said this was the most responsible plan he had heard so far. the "washington journal" editorial page pro business, been saying this for a while. that provides a lot of cover for republicans who may want to do this. marco rubio actually wants this. his people calculated if he will
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run for president, he needs an accomplishment. doesn't need to just be talking it, he needs to find a way to finesse this. >> one thing to watch is rush limbaugh in his interview. he said yesterday on his show, i want to call on fox news and others to join me defeating this plan. rush limbaugh still has juice with the base. >> it sort of strikes me this could have potential of setting up the health care fight where people in our universe think of it logically and policy aspects of it. you go back to districts, there's these massive town hall protests in of situation to it. a fr afl-cio labor will be with the president today and the wall street business editorial page was with it yesterday but will they have district by district presence to help sell the bill? >> that's tricky. just because you have the establishment encoresing it does not mean the rank and file- >> your point earlier, district
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by district is different than state by state and the problem with the president going over the heads of members. >> mitch mcconnell, his standing currently and going forward getting pressure from the left inside kentucky, a new poll out from the louisville courier journal showing him struggling with support of kentucky voters. 34% saying they would vote against him, 17% vote for him and 44% would wait to see who would vote against him. nothing more than an irresponsible way to stir up cheap headlines. >> stunning. only 17% in an electorate says they will vote for the guy the top republican in the u.s. senate, deadly numbers. >> the guy's been there a long time. >> a third of republicans, only 34% say they would vote for him regardless of his opponents. that's a danger on the right. >> the idea mitch mcconnell has
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trouble on the right tells you what you need to know as to the republican party. the guy is not a squish. pretty conservative. >> welcome in ashley judd. >> let me ask you guys, don't get so excited yet, sam. so jim and mike, have you ever seen a sitting incumbent such as mitch mcconnell with these numbers, it doesn't matter what staff says, i would be horrified if i was a sitting incumbent. this is bad news. >> it's not surprise as tom daschle lost when he was a senate member. we're told the mcconnell team had more than 100 meetings with tea party members and met with the folks. he hired his dad's -- a paul family supporter aide as his
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campaign manager to try to buy insurance there. another surprising development was groups on the left including a moveon.org affiliate have said publicly, they're going to give money to support republicans who might run against him. >> the primary process is so out of control for the republican party mitch mcconnell could find himself with a primary challenger that could cost him a seat. >> he won't be caught napping. >> i don't think it will happen. >> go on the circle line tour. >> haters. thanks, guys, coming up next on sports. >> i'm not trying to take all the credit, but i think that it's clear that going up against me prepared them to take on kevin duran and russell westbrook. >> president obama welcoming lebron james an the miami heat to the white house. we'll show you more of that when
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welcome back to "morning joe." 6:38 in new york. turning to sports now. look out now, tiger woods looking pretty good. >> looked pretty good over the
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weekend. >> over the weekend. bad weather pushed parts of the farmer's open to be pushed to yesterday. monday, tiger woods took a six streak lead in torrey pines. sliced it. drops his club in disdisgugusdi. tough stance out of the sand. a couple feet, maybe one foot of the putt. that's tiger in on the final hole tapping in for the win four shots ahead of brent snedeker. eighth career win at torrey pines and his first tour victory since last july. tiger now has 75 career pga tour victories, a couple months away from the masters. the heat joined president obama yesterday to celebrate their nba title. while mingling with the big three the president put in a plug for his own skills.
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>> i know this is the first trip for some of these players but a few of them were here a couple years ago for a pickup game on my birthday. now, i'm not trying to take all the credit, coach, but i think that it's cheer going up against me prepared them to take on kevin duran and russell westbrook. it sharpened their skills. it gave them the competitive edge that they needed, and i think part of the reason they came back today is they want another shot at the old guy. >> i mean, we're in the white house. the coach said -- the press said it's real casual so i mean from chicago and dallas, texas, michigan and ohio, south dakota, miami, i mean, we in the white house right now. this is like, hey, momma, i made
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it! >> by the way, there's a short list of people in america who don't impress, lebron james is one of them. >> can we do away with the hate lebron movement in this country? he's a pretty good guy, pretty charming guy. >> yes. he's come out the other end of the whole debacle. >> except in cleveland. >> just lost the whole ohio primary. >> what does president obama need to do if he wants real progress on climate change? is it a pipe dream? the editor of "rolling stone" magazine with his article on climate challenge, back in a moment. [ man ] ring ring... progresso
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you're sitting here together. everybody is talking about it already, this is very improbable. why did you want to do this? >> i desperately wanted him. if i wanted him to say yes to me, how am i going to justify saying no to my president. it was a great decision despite my hesitancy about it. i was like this and he was relaxed and everything like tha that. >> that was conan playing with the "60 minutes" interview. the sun comes slowly over the white house. "rolling stone," jeff goodall's article latest issue touches on president obama's inaugural challenge on climate change in the end, no matter what kind of deal the administration makes with china, the harsh truth, it be enough to diffuse the climate crisis unless he takes a bold stance and solution like cap and tax or carbon tax and unless he
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limits the change in response to future generations and response to global warm iing requiring de of birth do something he has shown little inclination for, leading a massive grassroots campaign to rally the american people and overcome the fossil fuel industry and its republican allies. what has the president done and realistically possible the next four years. not the first thing was fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, a very big deal, will save 6 billion tons of carbon going into the atmosphere in the life of the program. that was a big deal and cut that deal in the bailout industry and had them over a big barrel. he has done a lot of investment with the green energy renewables. he hasn't really talked about it. that's a problem not just about
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rhetoric, helping the american people understand why this is important and why we need political action on this. >> give me an example of the fear mongering you referred to. >> well, the house republicans, you know, the classic global warming is a hoax. it will destroy the economy if we try to do anything on carbon tax, put any kind of price own electricity for fossil fuels, the whole, the entire u.s. economy is dependent upon cheap gas. if we change anything in that equation, everything will fall apart. there is a clear rhetoric that goes back for decades. the power industry is very good at saying if you raise the price of electricity and force us to put scrubbers on coal plants, we can't guarantee the viability of the plants and the investment is so huge people won't be able to
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afford to heat their homes. there is a lot of rhetoric any time you want to mess with the status quo. >> jeff, why do you think he will need to rally popular support on this? why do you think this doesn't break through. you look at the existential list, climate change is always near the bottom at 2 or 3 or 4 or 5%. why is this? for all the attention given in the media and al gore, why i don't it break through in the media? >> too many people think it's about saving polar bears and distant things that happens to children in future generations and won't impact their lives. >> i think it is changing because of hurricane sandy and extreme weather events. people see this is not a fantasy of crazy tree huggers, happening now and more quickly than we know. the science is getting better
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and better what's really going on. improved hugely and people have a better understanding. they are seeing the cost, $70 billion for sandy or something like that. insurance companies are seeing the cost of extreme weather events, plus the renewable energy starting to take hold. starting to see the price of wind being as cheap as foot s l foot -- fossil fuels. i think the president has an opportunity. >> katty case in washington. >> you mentioned alternative energy sources. as america becomes increasingly rapidly independent with discoveries of the shale gas, is there a risk investment on research in alternative energy resources will start drying up? >> yeah. that has the big question with the shale gas boom, lowering the price of natural gas and basically putting the coal industry out of business from a
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global warming point of view, is a good thing. it does take away some of the funding or some of the energy towards renewables because natural gas is seen as a bridge to the next 20 or 30 years. if it can be done right, is a good thing. the question is whether it can be done right with problems associated with fracking and leaking of methane from these wells. >> you called for the president to halt the keystone pipeline. why is that a concern for environmentalists, people saying to go around the dunes and can make it safe and create thousands and thousands of jobs. >> in addition, that oil will g happen either way and get it out of the tar sands. >> i disagree. it has to be transported.
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getting that pipeline out of vancouver is a big deal, not a no-brainer. a lot of first nations in british columbia, lining up against it, at best a 10 year project. think that is far from a done deal. the question is if the keystone is stopped, there's the possibility of railroads and things like that. that becomes more difficult, increasingly expensive. i know what you're saying, that oil is in the ground, it's there, there's a sense it will come out. i think that it's not a simple story. >> jeff goodall, the piece is in the article of "rolling stone" magazine. give it a read. coming up, we talk immigration reform two senators leading the charge, john mccain and chuck schumer, bipartisan on immigration reform. [ manager 1 ] out here in the winds,
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there are certain anatomical facts about upper body strength. >> when you're a 6'4" inch marine and you need the marine next to you to carry you back to safety and the marine next to you is a 5'4" woman who weighs 115 pounds, it's relevant.
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>> you can't have women in combat because they're tiny. they're tiny. too delicate. i have like eight of them in my hand. they're little with their wee little hands and feet. ever seen them eat? pick up a dinner roll -- tiny little sharp teeth. wait a minute. i'm thinking of mice. mice should not be serving in the military no matter how adorabl adorable! sergeant whiskers, i can't nape on you. has a thimble for a helmet. coming up next from the "washington post," eugene robinson and gail collins. we have vice president al gore with us along with bill gates, also straight ahead, john mccain and chuck schumer talk about their ground breaking bill on immigration reform. [ female announcer ] when a woman wears a pad
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why did you want to do this together, a joint interview? thank you very much.
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>> that was a little awkward, wasn't it? >> that was just uncomfortable. gos gosh. >> we're looking at reagan international airport. a beautiful sunrise. it will be warm today. bill karins says it will get pretty ugly. welcome back to "morning joe." we have sam stein and steve rattner. joining me at the table in new york is "new york times" columnist, gail collins and associate editor of the "washington post" eugene robinson. also the bbc's katty kay. it's great to have all of you guys with us here today. thank you so much. steve rattner, this time yesterday we had paul krugman on the show. you actually said in an e-mail talking about your concerns krugman suggested we don't have
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to worry about long term debt so much, deficits, long term debt number 5, maybe number 6 on the list. you took exception to it and said denying the coming debt was like being a climate change denier. >> i think actually mika started that analogy and paul krugman basically said the opposite. to me, being a debt denier is the same thing as being a climate change denier. we're putting tons of carbon in our atmosphere we have to deal with and incurring billions of debt everyday we have to deal with. they're the same problems. do you recognize they're problems and deal with them or sit and let them fester until something bad happens. >> what do you say about what paul krugman says, it's a problem but it won't be a problem until 20 years from now and let's not deal with the
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problem. >> in the order of magnitude we know the problem will be worse. about 60 trillion dollars of unfunded liabilities. the longer you wait the tougher it is. i get the argument the jobs in the economy are still weak and we need to deal with that. that's fine. you can have responsible proposals for dealing with that. larry summers put forward responsible ways to deal with that but we need to put in a framework how we want to deal with it. that's what bothered me that krugman rejected all that and said wait until we get out there and then see what the problem is. like waiting to see after we put a lot of carbon in the atmosphere and see if we can still breathe. >> on behalf of paul krugman, he's arguing against people sitting around hysterically in washington nothing matters but the debt. nothing matters but the debt. he's arguing long term debt matters long term but right now
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we have to fix the economy and get the economy stimulated. there's nothing more dangerous than to talk about your first priority to chop away at the budget when you really need to gin up the economy. >> doesn't he ignore one of the realities in this discussion long term debt plays a huge role in companiy ies hiring people today. they worry about the debt about the national debt and uncertainty of it all and not putting people on the payrolls. >> the uncertain plays a role and size of the debt plays a role. you could have somebody, i think richard haass, interest rate reaction, in fact, interest rates have been moving up a bit the market says enough. gail, i don't disagree with you or him on this point instead of saying long term debt is a problem and we need policies to deal with it but we need something short term, larry
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summers more over saying let's not think about the long term entitlements until we get there and solve the short term. at the very least, you have to do both. >> you have to give credit, people are worried, screaming my god, inflation, loss of confidence, all these things and they haven't happened. they haven't been the problems. the problems haven't been inflation, the problems haven't been loss of faith in our credit, the problem has been a lack of juice for the economy. so, just, my guy, pull paul -- >> there you go. the problem is, richard haass, president of the council on foreign relations said it's not a problem until the day it is a problem and it doesn't just sneak up on you, you fall off a cliff. the entire economy goes down with it. we're not saying that's going to happen in the next year, five years or next ten years even. we don't know when it's going to happen and why we should prepare for the future.
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one of the things frustrating for me, willie geist, you and i, you know what we love to do at the holiday inn on 57th and 11, we love getting our cigarettes out and smoking a couple cartons and quoting great authors. i remember you told me it was f. scott fitzgerald the first test of a first rate intelligence is someone that's able to hold two opposing ideas in their mind at the same time and continue functioning. you remember when you told me that a couple weeks ago when we were watching honey boo-boo? >> i think that was a lou holtz quote but go ahead. >> i think it was f. scott fitzgerald. the thing that drives me crazy in this debate. i repeat it all the time, hoping somebody on twitter is going to get it, and they're just not. unfortunately, a lot of politicians in washington, i do agree with paul on this, can't chew gum and walk at the same time. you can do that and we have to
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do two things at the same time in this country and we have to take care of the long term debt. when do that, that is not what david cameron is enacting in great britain, enacting austerity measures now and slashing spending now. we're talking about the long haul. for some reason when you talk about taking care of things 10, 15, 20 years from now, people will raise their arms and scream, no, we can't do that. that's austerity. you can't cut spending while in an economic downturn. of course, we can't. we can plan for the future while spending some now. >> it seems to me, sam, the real problem is people don't just focus on this during a time of economic crisis. people in boom times you can't cut social security and you have to protect medicaid at all
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costs. >> in the same climate we have this discussion in boom times and the wage gap an under-reported story, much closer. economic growth, job growth is a measure because you have people paying higher percentage taxes as long as they get higher paying jobs. not so much we have a debt problem, we have a health care spending problem. a lot of debt we incur is because of out of control health care costs. 92 sam, we do have a debt problem along with the health care problem. we have a debt problem. not the health care costs are the primary contributor to the debt problem we have. what we're lacking in this conversation is any time people try to touch health care costs in long term, this is the same on both sides, everyone is culpable here, there is a huge hysterical political reaction. it becomes almost impossible have a sustained in civil
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conversation how to reform medicare because you will get demonized. >> moy problem with that argument, gene robinson, every time you talk about numbers out there, erskine bowls, former chief of staff of bill clinton and the joint chiefs chairman, a lot of people in the middle, concord coalition, they say medicare and medicaid is going to cause an economic collapse if we don't take care of those programs in the long haul. >> what should we do? >> when you bring that up, people say, you know what, it's a health care problem. let's fix health care and all that will magically go away. we as a country don't do good jobs fixing health care. look at '93 and '94 and 2009 and 2010. we don't -- we can't reform such a complex system in a way that's going to turn things around on a dim dime. >> if you don't -- you can't turn it around on a dime if you don't do something about medical
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care costs long term, the costs, not just who pays for it. ultimately, don't we still incur the responsibility to pay for that stuff? it's not being paid through the existing programs now i can pretty much guarantee there will be a new program of some sort in which we still pay some of these costs because i don't think they're all going to be offloaded onto the elderly. i don't think that will happen. the costs are not irrelevant here. they are the main target. the question, you think about long term debt, what do we do? what's the goal? stabilize the debt at a certain percentage of gdp? 70% or whatever? that would be a certain set of measures. then, when you're talking about medicare for example, does it make sense to raise the
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eligibility age? a lot of people would say, no. it doesn't in that for all its problems, medicare is actually arguably lower costs than having these people try to get insurance in the market and subsidizing them somehow. why are you taking people out of a system that is arguably more efficient than the rest of the system? so just saying it's not easy to figure out what to do. >> it's not easy. unless erskine bowles and simpson and everybody else, katty kay, is misleading us, they're on a wild ride, we're facing a crisis of great proportions when it comes to entitlement spending. i wonder if we end up where great britain is now where we're left with little choice but to make huge cuts at the very ends of the day instead of planning
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ahead. we have a little bit of space. >> paul krugman said, we have a little bit of breathing room than european countries. that runs out at some point. >> you do have more space and the interest rates are lower and the american public aren't feeling the pain of your debt than under george bush senior when interest rates were higher and markets can look at politicians and say we don't believe you have the capacity to deal with a long term problem. they can turn on america in a dime and send interest rates up and we would be talking about the deficit a lot faster. the route great britain has taken is tricky looking at a triple dip recession because of austerity programs and haven't actually brought down the debt as much as a forecast. i agree with sam, the long term
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problem is health care problem specifically elderly problem. at some point, america has to face up to the fact you won't have the services for the elderly you always had unless you raise a heck of a lot more revenue. there has to be some rationalization of medical services. paying doctors to give services has been an inefficient way managing your health care system. that has to change in the long ru run. >> we're not just talking about, not like it's static, not like the same number of seniors today five years from now or 10 years from now. >> it will get a lot worse in 20 years. >> what i think a lot of americans don't understand. we have willie geist, today, we have three people working for every one person on social security and medicare. it used to be 15 people working for every one person on social security and soon it will be two people working for every one
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person on medicare or social security. >> it's completely unsustainable. >> can i leave with one point in my mind, we are stealing from our children, basically taking out of the system everyone close to retirement a multiple of everything put into the system. that becomes debt and that has to be paid by our children. we can keep doing that but doesn't feel right to me. >> you have been writing about hillary clinton. >> talking about old people, coming to me -- >> and they will retire the remainder of her 2008 campaign debt and sit down interview with "60 minutes," what do you make of this, not the four years as secretary of state and the way she's being thrown out of office with rose petals by the president. >> she always does this. two weeks ago, disaster after disaster, blood clots and hearings. and now it's fantastic.
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i think he's grateful that she was not only willing to work for him in the administration but is in the administration, she's such a hugely high profile person but she's been a real team player. she hasn't given him any grief. she's been a big help. she's worked like a maniac in his interest. she's never crossed him over. she's also brought all that incredible good will that the clintons now bring, so much good will that paul ryan this week is running around saying if only clinton were in office, we could get all these things taken care of. it's incredible. she's on another hillary clinton roll. >> do you think there is an appreciation for them, probably the two most scrutinized people, lives written about incessantly and relate to each other in a way you can't relate to any else.
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>> that's right. having never experienced it, i presume. >> do you see any way hillary clinton can't run for president given her standing while she leaves office her standings higher than anybody in politics, how could she not run? >> she could not run if she doesn't feel up to it. that doesn't mean she feels ill. that kind of campaign, as everybody knows, is a two or three year marathon killer. if she simply decides that's not something she's prepared to sustain, that's a good answer. >> i want to get to gene's column as well writing in the "washington post" about the republican party's lost ways. republicans shouldn't worry president obama is trying to destroy the gop. why would he bother? the party's leaders are doing a pretty good job of it themselves. i have to wonder if the gop is getting tactics and messaging part right. michael steele served as party chairman when the republicans
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won a sweeping victory in 2010 he was promptly fired. reince priebus presided over the 2012 disaster he was give ainu term as chairman. but no matter who's in charge the gop wit have a tough time winning elections until it has a better understanding of the nation n. if boehner is worried about being swept into the dust bin of history, he and other republicans need to put dunn the broom. >> having lost 71% of the latino vote isn't this a conscious effort on the part of lindsey graham and marco rubio, how they have to look at things. >> absolutely. and the subject of immigration is happening awfully fast. these were voices telling the party months ago, this is a threshold issue for latino voters and they wasn't even give us a hearing unless we're less
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hostile on the immigration issue. i do think it goes beyond that. if the republican party is going to connect with the nation on a national level the way it would like to, it has to, to win the white house, it will have the do more than throw a bone on immigration, it will have to look at the country. which has changed since a lot of senior republicans have paid attention and see how it's changed and understand americans today and what they believe about various issues, like abortion. like the proper role of government and the relationship between government and the individual. this is not your grandfather's america yet i think it's your grandfather's republican party. >> certainly not even your father's america. things have changed so quickly,
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gene, over the past five, six, seven years, katty brought it up earlier, the republican party has changed even more quickly over the five, six, seven years and said this morning if mitt romney had the same number of latino numbers percentage-wise george w. bush had in 2004, he'd be president romney right now. this republican party, whether you talk about immigration, assault weapons, a variety of issues, seem to still be focused how things were in 1994. >> if you lose latino voters for a generation and lose asian-americans the fastest growing minority group in the country voted 73% for obama. where did that come from and that's that about? >> a great question. something the party needs to be thinking about. gene, thanks so much as always. greatly appreciated. we'll be reading your column in
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today's "washington post." gail, stick around. when we come back. a political headline calls them immigration's odd couple, two men leading the bipartisan effort on immigration reform. senator john mccain and chuck schumer next on "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice.
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there are 11 million human beings in this country today undocumented. that's not something any is happy about, not something any wanted to see what happened. it is what has happened. whaef an obligation and need to address the reality we face. i think today is an important first step in what's going to be a significantly complicated journey. the issue of immigration is not a simple one but we have the opportunity to do it right. if we do, think we'll do a tremendous service to our
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countr country. >> with us from capitol hill is chuck schumer frand john mccain. you led a bipartisan effort on immigration reform and had the president and most of the media on that and the public turned against it and things went south fairly quickly. how have things changed the past five or six years or so to make it different this time around? >> i think, joe e, o, is the polarization of the hispanic vote and realization amongst republicans that when a democrat candidate gets 71% of the vote, we can do the math and see the descent towards irrelevantsy or failure to win an election.
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there's an awareness on the part of american people we can't have 11 million people living in the shadows forever. i want to emphasize we want to not repeat this again. in 1986 we gave amnesty to 3 million people and said we would secure the borders and we didn't and we now have 11 million. one of the areas of agreement we have, a number of areas, besides a path to citizenship is securing our borders. we still have drugs flowing across our borders in a huge quantity across the arizona border. citizens in the southern part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and
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chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who can't find jobs themselves. how do you answer that criticism? >> even our principles, which
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are broad, answer both those criticisms. first, we do provide a path to citizenship but not a path to citizenship that's easy. you have to work, pay taxes. you'll pay a fine. there'll be some admission of wrongdoing. it is not amnesty in any sense of the word. we're making that clear. we also, one of our watch words is you won't be treated better than somebody who didn't cross the border. if somebody applied in mexico city or singapore for a visa at the em bass sin 2007 and one of their fellow citizens crossed the border in 2008, that person in 2007 who applied for a visa will get the ability to become an american first. we're dealing with that. on the second issue, we will tie new employment to americans working and will have a much tougher system of enforcement
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because we will have some kind of non-forgeable employer identification and that will not allow future waves of illegal immigration to come. as john said, we don't want to deal with this again. this is intended to be a permanent solution. not only is there control at the border but a strong onus on employers who hire illegals they will get really hit hard with fines and jail time. there's an identifier, haven't figured what it will be, i prefer a sandusocial security c benefit biometric we all use and the amount will go way down. >> and the 40 million people who overstayed their visas, we will crack down on that, too. >> and senator mccain, when you say you will crack down on that, they're still part of this program where they can ultimately have some part of
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formal residency. the point willie made bothering your constituents, the most conservative americans, listening to senator shuman illustrate a strong case why it's sale ibable. >> and president obama with a more liberal plan, is it safe to assume your plan will get attention in the senate rather than the obama plan? >> hopefully we can work together with the president as we did in previous times. we look forward. there will be some differences between ourselves and the president and i think we can iron out any of those. we have to show my constituents and our republicans that, as chuck just said, this is not amnesty, it's a tough road to citizenship but we've got to give them the opportunity to do so. you can't have 11 million people living in the shadows forever. that is a growing realization
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amongst our republican friends. of course, there will be resistance. there will be resistance on chuck's side of the aisle because maybe these are too tough provisions, people saying you don't have to secure the border first. that's what bipartisanship is supposed to be about and compromise. >> in reference to the president, senator durbin and i talked to the president sunday night. he was very positive. his worry is not so much our proposal different than his. ours is a bipartisan proposal when a democrat or republican comes out with his proposal, it will be one more conservative or liberal in the other but we have to meet in the middle. the president was extremely supportive and put out a nice statement yesterday. i think he will show this is his idea where we should be, he will work with us to have a good
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strong bipartisan bill. we cannot pass this bill if republicans or democrats are opposed. we have to meet somewhere in the middle. i have found, this is goods news, senator menendez and durbin had a nice long talk with the hispanic community sunday. they understand that if we're going to get something done information the things they believe in there has to be some degrees of compromise. >> senator shum mchumer, katty n washingt washington. when you talk to the business community, surprising how unified they are in a reformed immigration plan. how do you plan to unify them to sell to the republicans and the nation? >> the business community is fully supportive what we've done and on an issue that scuttled previous immigration reform, what do you do with future immigrants once you stop the
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flow. and immigrants and labor are in good serious discussion, the business community is very important. john said this earlier, i want to underscore it. if you look at polling data, americans have had a sea change since '77. 70% support a fair balanced plan with a pathway to citizenship and illegal immigration. 70% of the southwest supports it. the public is on our side. we can't let strident voices from the far right or far left scuttle this effort. >> in response to your questions, we have to convince our republican base this is not amnesty, a tough path to citizenship but it is an opportunity. they get in line behind everyone
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in this country that has come to get a green card. that's an important selling point my base. >> there will be fines, r recompense for wrongdoing and community service. when something does something wrong you don't punish them forever and don't do that in any system in america. y you don't have to do it here and say fine -- and then we do it for the next 50 years and detriment to the economy of this country. >> what do we say to guest workers who come here and provide an enormous benefit to huge elements of the economy and instead of staying, they stay illegally. what do we do about guest workers. we realize agricultural is unique. whether in arizona or upstate in new york in our dairy industry, you can't get americans to do the kind of work our farmers
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need. we've seen that happen. we will have a specific program for agricultural workers who want to come, pick the crops and go back home in the winter season. >> we will have a program for high-tech people in this country. we want a lot of them to stay here and don't want to chase them out because they're green cards and we will also deal with temporary high-tech workers for one reason or the other. we have to have business and labor come together. >> senator mccain, can i ask you really quickly -- >> go ahead. >> thousands and thousands of young men and women come here to our universities and go back to where they came from. we want to give them an opportunity to stay here. go ahead, joe.
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>> that's great news. we're looking forward to somebody comes from across the world the united states and gets an advanced degree and they can stay and create jobs in mesa, arizona instead of going back. let me ask you about the comments of ted cruz, says your bill is profoundly unfair to immigran immigrants. he's been harshly critical? >> i hope he will come out with a product -- there's very few people i've known including senators who voiced opposition believe the status quo is satisfactory. we'll work with him as hard as we can. >> thank you for being here and senator chuck schumer. great to see you guys working together. coming up, former senate majority leader tom daschle as well as former senate leader
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coming up, a new documentary series looking deep into the reagan presidency and cabinet and challenges they faced at home and abroad.
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weaver talki we're talking to them straight ahead. we have the former governor of vermont howard dean and former senate leader tom daschle when we return. [ nyquil bottle ] hey tylenol, you know we're kinda like twins. [ tylenol bottle ] we are? yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't.
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welcome back to "morning joe." a live look at the washington on a beautiful washington day. live from washington, we have tom daschle, a senior policy advisor at the government affairs firm d.a.l. piper. and his new book, fundamentals of american government. with us, former governor of vermont, chairman of the democratic national committee, howard dean. sam stein and katty kay are
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still with us. senator daschle, let's talk with you. i'm surprised how many senators we talk to these days just don't like their jobs. so many are leaving seats they could stay in forever. saxby chambliss and jay rockefeller made the decision as well. you go up and ask them why, they just don't feel like they're getting anything done anymore and they don't like it. what's change so radically over the past 10, 15 years? >> joe, i think a lot of things have changed. the climate within the senate. you have a lot more radical eleme element brought about in part by redistricting, the primary process, the amount of money that goes into campaigns. you've seen a polarization in part because of the media. mostly in large measure because senators don't have the capacity to work together like they did before. there's far less opportunity for socializing and comity that comes with an institution so
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dependent upon it like the senate. people come to the senate wantiwant wanting to make a big difference. that's less and less the case today. people don't feel they can contribute like they want to like you saw this morning on immigration. they want to see more of that. >> they sure do. i used to see you and trent lott on me"meet the press" and you would scratch and snarl and attack each other and say the most horrible things. then, like two professional lawyers walk out of there and be friends. trent lott still considers you a good friend. at what point in the senate did you stop being able to disagree with somebody without being disagreeable? >> we installed a hotline, joe. i think that really made a difference. we called each other when we had a temper tantrum and picked up the phone. we knew if that phone was ringing, it was him on the other line. that made a big difference. we created a communication
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agreement that allowed us to get through tough times, 9/11, the anthrax attack in my office and decision to go to war in afghanistan and iraq and that drew us together. you don't have the same element of crazies like you do today but as you look at the challenges we face, you could call them that. >> listening to senator daschle talk about socialization part of the problem in the senate and fund-raising part of the problem in the senate. you look back at recent history last 25, 30, 40 years, this country faced larger problems than today, war in vietnam, the end of the nixon presidency yet people got along in the congress much less the senate. >> this reflects what's going on with the american people. there was a culture war that started in my generation when i came of age in the '60s. what you've seen since 1994 is the rear guard action to stop it. it failed.
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i think president obama's re-election was the essentially the end of the culture war. there'll be more battles and the dem graphics and the fact young people, our boomer children have adopted our values, those wars are over, the rear guard in the senate, washington is always the last place to feel what's going on and why you feel this bitterness. >> governor, it's the end of the culture war and you won? >> that's right. i'm not saying there will not be any more battles, there will be. a whole generation has been skipped. i was thinking about this last night, i teach at yale. 40 year-olds won't really have power in this country, sort of go from our generation to the younger generation because of the internet. just talking about a 23-year-old girl in rwanda, her foreign aide
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is better than the isds. >> and there's a terrible generation that will rise up against this. >> they already have. i think this is what you're seeing in the senate and house right now. >> senator daschle, if you parachuted into the united states senate today, newly elected senator, would you recognize the place from the places you group in politically? >> i think you would. i think that obviously the institution itself is still very much intact. we had a discussion of our rules in the last couple of weeks. i think you're going to see the institution continue to evolve. but the basic components are still there, principles are still there. the founding fathers came up with a unique way for everyone to have a role, small states and large states and to contribute. those principles are still there.
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i'm act which encouraged. howard is right, demographics are changing politics and as they change on immigration, they will change on climate and a number of areas i think the american people will demand senators and congressman find common ground a lot more effectively. we're beginning to see that in the first three weeks of this session. >> let me say also senator and governor dean, the demographics will also change the debt debate. as steve rattner said, we're stealing from the next generation. i can tell you my 25-year-old son and a lot of his friends that even come from more progressive backgrounds are a bit more libertarian, a bit more skeptical of their government because they see the government today stealing from them. so we will have cross currents here. certainly, the demographics are break weigh from a republican party stuck in 1994, but the economics certainly tend to go the other way.
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>> that's exactly right. these young people are more conservative than the average democrat in my generation because of what they've gone through. you are going to look for a serious, i think serious attempt to deal with the deficit by this younger generation. they do not believe in what's going on in terms of the spending. >> pot smoking journalists are exception. and we bring in sam stein to be represent that demographic. sam? >> i'm so high right now, i can barely ask the question. >> work through it. >> senator daschle, you write about in your book the dysfunction in the senate because of the an busts filibuster. but i didn't read necessarily an endorsement of fill butter reform. do you support the idea of a talk filibuster or 40-vote threshold to uphold the filibuster and if not, why not in the. >> the of the thanks for the plug. two things. one, i don't think you really
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need a lot of reform. if you go back to the way the rules were original little applied, 191917 to 1967, we had 45 clotures. in the last congress, we had 113. that says all you need to know about the direction it's taken. if we didn't dual and triple and quadruple track, that is to set aside bills as filibusters came up and if we required everybody to hold the floor while they were filibustering, those two fundamental things which is what we did prior to the 1970s, we won't have many of the problems we have today. senator reid and senator mcconnell did a very good job in moving the senate in the right direction. if we would use those two principles, we would basically accomplish what we set out to do. >> senator tom daschle, the author of the u.s. senate fundamentals of american government, you can read an excerpt on our blog at mo joep company msnbc.com. go to your local bookstore and buy it today or you can get it
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on amazon.com, one of those new fangled web sites that will sam stein tells me about. thank you so much, senator. >> what's a website? >> thank you. >> howard, stick around, if you will. we've got pulitzer price winning author dave barry coming up. and inside the reagan presidency through the eyes of his closest advisors. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time...
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and aren't we all doing that, former vice president al gore and bill gates will be our guests. and coming up next, the signs point to 2016 as hillary clinton gets a parting gift from president obama's donors. what a hill rit presidential run would mean for this white house, next on "morning joe." all stations come over to mission a for a final go. no go call. this is for real this time. we are on step seven point two one two. we have entered our two minute hold.
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good morning. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. willie, good lord, it's like 1:30. what are you doing out there? what are you doing, joe. >> it's ugly, man. you don't know what i'm doing. >> just back from chateau mar month, i guess, huh. >> i am. i stayed up all night with the boys eating munch kins. good stuff. in new york, willie geist, mike barnicle, sam stein is, steve rattner. and in washington, katty kay. willie geist, an awful lot to talk about, including you almost wanted to hear don pardo say, and tell them what they want. hillary gets these parting gifts, a "60 minutes" sendoff by the president of the united states and yesterday, lots of cash. >> yeah, it looks like is the obama campaign is going to retire her debt. according to bloomberg business week's josh green, a friend of the show, a group of obama donors deciding to pay off the 2008 campaign debt she ran un, which came to about 250,000
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bucks of last year. 120 people cut checks to pay off her bills. so we're going to get into that story a little bit. you put that together with the "60 minutes" interview, a nice parting package for hillary clinton. >> no doubt about it. also out of washington, it looks like gridlock finally getting set aside for a comprehensive immigration bill. we'll still see whether it passes at the end of the day or not. you know, you had a lot of people in washington, d.c. back in 2007 saying republicans and democrats had come together, willie. and then it was sidetracked. not so sure if that is going to happen again, but certainly republicans and the president feeling like they may get a deal on immigration. >> yeah, and the moment feels a little bit different. john mccain himself said on sunday we have to do something about the latino vote. president obama won 71% of it in the election a few months ago. he said today actually the president is to unveil his own plan for immigration renorm in
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las vegas, nevada, a state where hispanics make up about 27% of the population, a day after as you said a bipartisan group of eight senators reached a compromise how to move forward with comprehensive immigration reform. included in that bill a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented workers who are currently in this country. >> other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform nan supporting it. >> an what's going on now is unacceptable. in reality, what's been created is a defacto amnesty. we have been too content for too long to allow individuals to mow our lawn, serve our food, clean
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our homes, and even watch our children while not affording them any of the benefits that make our country so great. >> so a few of the bullet points here, under the senate framework, those seeking citizenship would be required to register with the government, settle debts with the government including paying fines and back taxes, undergo a criminal background check and learn english and american civics. yesterday, marco rubio sought to win over conservatives opposed to signing off on any deal that hits of ax necessity. >> there are 11 million human fwheengs this country today undocumented. that's not something anyone is happy about or wanted to see happen. but it is what has happened. and we have an obligation and the need to address the reality of the situation that we face. i think today's an important first step in what's going to be a significant complicated journey because the issue is not a simple one.
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i think we'll do a tremendous service to our country. >> it remains to be seen how far this gets once we get deeper into the senate and over to the house. but it does represent a pretty significant change when you see john mccain and lynn say graham standing there, talking about what they're talking about in terms of a bill that even hints at amnesty. >> no doubt about it. things have changed dramatically over the past five years. there's still going to be conservatives in the republican house though that are going to want to be an sured by marco rubio, any other republican asking them to support this bill that this bill won't be a repeat of what ronald reagan signed in 1986, which was an out and out amnesty bill. not only did it grant amnesty to the millions of illegal immigrants in america then, it really didn't look forward and plan forward to make sure that you didn't continue a steady stream of illegal immigrants into the country. so they're looking back, mike barnicle, at 1986, ronald reagan
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again and congress passing a bill that will only caused more problems in the future, but i think they feel like this time around, they're going to get it right. >> well, they'd better get it right, joe. i don't know whether there's a way for chuck schumer and harry reid to make marco rubio the point person in this, but that would be an electric thing for the progress and eventual success of this thing if he were to play an important role in the senate. the trick is, as willie and you just alluded to, what happens when this bill goes over to the house of representatives? i would think given what's going on within elements of the house republican party, you know, someone's got to sit down with them and basically ask the question, don't you think, katty, are you interested, is the republican party interested in carrying a national election within the next 0 years? >> well, and that's the split, isn't it, they've got look at. if mitt romney had won the share
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of hispanic votes in 2012 that george bush got back in 2004, we'd be looking at president romney right now. the republican party has to decide, do we try and go for the presidential elections in which case we have do better with the hispanic vote and that means, frankly we have to do immigration reform or are you a house republican member from a seat in south carolina and you're worried about who's going to run against you in a primary from the right, if you support and sign up for immigration reform because you know that primary challenge is going to come from somebody who's more conservative than you who is going to say i know that the constituents don't like immigration reform, they hate the idea of a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, so i'm going to counter you in your primary challenge. that's the dynamic at play for house republicans, they're looking for their own seat and the party as a whole. they've got to think if we have more conservative people elected, the house republican party looks more conservative,
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as well. >> this seems like the first and most obvious instance in which gerrymanderinging will have a legislative effect. this is issue is totally different district by district than it is state by state. marco rubio has his work cut out for him because he is going to be the point person in selling this to the conservative house caucus and also conservative radio. he's going to be doing hits with rush limbaugh today, for instance. he is the point person in talking to that universe. and wa he's selling them is essentially a package ta says there is amnesty, but we're going to have strenuous own onerous requirements on people beforehand and have a system setup where we will ensure the border is secure. >> i like the way you describe limbaugh's audience that is universe. >> i was being generous i thought. >> look, i don't know whether this bill's going to get through for all the reasons you guys have been talking about, but for the reasons we've also mentioned it gets closer than anything we've seen before, first because
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the republicans should have something like this and because this bill does address their concerns. particularly, you just alluded to it, the principle the border has to be secure before you start dealing with these people. one question is whether what joe mentioned happened in the '80s is going to get addressed which is that it does stop the flow and you don't have this problem again. look, the right wing of the republicans can say what they're going to say. i think serve knows we are not going to deport 11 or 12 million illegal immigrants. so the question is what is the path, how do you deal with this in a way both sides are comfortable with that it's not rewarding people for bad behavior having snuck in the country. >> let's not dismiss the liberal concern, and that's that they're worried that the southwestern governors attorney generals, et cetera, will have a defacto signoff on whether this goes through. there's no detail as to what the sequencing is.
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who gives the okay, the border is secure, let's go ahead with the amnesty part of it. there is real concern by progressives we don't want to have the border component go through and none of the other stuff. >> by the way, from president obama himself who believes those are too strenuous. "the wall street journal" is saying this is a promising senate framework and it ought to be looked at pretty seriously. >> you know what's going to be interesting to see what the president says today about another aspect of immigration which is critical when you think about it, and a lot of people don't, the guest worker aspect. people come in here into this country, work for a period of time, and then they stay illegally because if they go back home, they can't come back in. dealing with that is going to be a really critical component, as well. >> there's the reality you need guest workers. this economy can't function without people to do the jobs some americans are not going to do.
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>> secretary of state hillary clinton getting quite the going away gift from the obama team. she steps down as secretary of state. josh green reporting a group of obama donors has decided to pay off the remainder of her 2008 campaign debt, which came to about $250,000 as of last year. 120 different people cut checks to pay off those bills. hillary clinton's campaign which never officially shut down now has a surplus of about $200,000 in the bank. should clinton decide to run in 2016, there's already a super pac supporting her, ready for hillary it's called garnering nearly 50,000 twitter followers. >> i'm sure steve rattner set up that account yesterday, willie. >> he's ready. >> fired up and ready to go. >> have you given money yet, steve, to hillary's super pac. >> i happily would. i have not. my wife and i were her second biggest fund-raisers in 2008. she is certainly the elephant in the room when it comes to 2016.
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>> i love that the super pac, the measure of the super pac strength is its twitter followers. >> who are those people? >> i guess we should ask you, steve, and ask your wife maureen, is hillary going to run? what does maureen say? >> i think the honest answer is, of course, we don't know. but i think when she gets some rest and sleeps off the last four years and looks around and says, i'm still really energetic and strong and probably one of the most popular politicians in the country, it's hard to imagine that she doesn't give this really, really serious thought. >> katty kay, where does joe biden fit into this picture? there was a lot made of that "60 minutes"en interview of the president giving a tacit agreement to hillary clinton as joe biden steamed somewhere off in his office? >> he loved that 60 minute" interview. the reality for joe biden is that it depends on hillary clinton. if she decides in four years time or in two years time, which
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is when it would have to be that she's had enough rest and come to the realization as her friends suggest that you know, she's never going to be a normal person who can just walk down the street by herself, she's always going to be hillary clinton anyway, so why not throw her hat in the ring. she's not going to be a private individual who can just retire from public life. she may, as well go for the presidency. if she makes that decision, then joe biden will have to back off. he's not going to run if hillary clinton is also running. he's in a difficult position. he's got to the sit and wait while she takes the rest she now feels she needs to take after this grueling four years. and then decide does she want to go for the presidency without this time around the kind of brutal primary campaign because no serious is democrat is going to run against her or does she feel she does want to take back as much of a private life as she can do? >> sam stein, we just have to of course, remember back to 2006
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and 2007 when hillary clinton was just as much the 800-pound elephant in the room, the giant, you know, that strode -- whatever you want to call it, she was the dominant force of the democratic party. and nobody believed, myself included, that anybody could rise up to beat her. nobody believed that. we're going to see that for the next couple of years. are we making the same mistake we made before? >> it gives me cold sweats we're talking about 2016 at this juncture. i will do it. >> come on, sam. >> i'm saying i want to do it. >> hold on. we're not talking about 2016. we're talking about 2013 and how joe biden moves going forward. barack obama's doing, barack obama and his administration are making decisions on where to put him out there for reasons. people say that, i'm not talking about 2016. but this shape the direction of the democratic party over the next four years. it will shape the president's
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relationship with the vice president. everything comes out of -- the second a lame duck president is elected in 2012 it, everybody starts looking at 2016 in washington. and this is not a parlor game. this is how it affects what goes on in washington, d.c., what byes are passed, what alliances are made, how the city operates and functions over the next four years. >> so this is why i think we'll keep talking about this for two years because the administration is invested in having biden still be perceive as a presidential possibility. presidential possibility. it gives him more power. it allows people to conceive of him as being someone of influence who matter in a couple years time. as soon as it becomes clear that joe biden is not going to be a candidate, he instantly loses that cache. i think they're invested in not having this conversation for a year. with respect to joe's first question about hillary in 2006, and how we all thought she was this unbeatable giant, yeah, i think there's the same
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probability of us overemphasizing her strengths here. you get a lot more sympathetic coverage when you're the secretary of state traveling the world where you don't have to be at the epicenter of these hot political debates over health care, deficit reduction. don't have to take those positions. i think she's benefitted from that. at the same time she has an immense amount of experience that makes her a very obvious candidate. >> coming up next, a play by play of the reagan presidency. a new film documents america's 40th president as members of his administration reflecting on how he would tackle the challenges of the nation. we'll talk to chip duncan coming up next. also, columnist dave barry will be with us on set. but first, here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> joe, a serious forecast today. life-threatening forecast over the next 48 hours. tornados possible and if not that, we're going to see extreme winds through a big chunk of the country knocking down trees. that always can be dangerous. the setup, very rare.
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like what we get in parch or april. temperatures are crazy throughout texas all the way into oklahoma and into missouri in the 60s and 70s even at this hour. notice the temperature in kansas city. it was 67 at midnight. now down to 48. you're safe but your friends in oklahomaing from tulsa to little rock, the ozarks down to louisiana, pay attention to the forecast even after you go to sleep tonight. you need to have the weather regard on. with these storms and possible tornados, that's the most dangerous time for you and your family. most of the storms are exiting areas of central oklahoma heading into southern kansas. so far no reports of tornadoes. pretty strong storms heading towards just south of kansas city, emporia into areas near columbia city, missouri. if you're in the yellow, you're in danger of strong storms. red color a moderate risk of severe storms where the highest concentration will be, the best chance of tornadoes will be later this afternoon through the
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overnight hours. it includes, little rock, memphis area, just outside of fort smith and shreveport. over night tonight, even if you're in alabama, atlanta by 9 or 10:00 a.m., these line of storms will roll through your area. a good chunk of the nation will have to deal with the storm system and possible damaging winds and tornadoes throughout the next 48 maurpz i'll continue to have you updated here on msnbc. you're watching "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep.
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we didn't have a so-called war on typical but we were fighting it nonetheless. >> i think the events have brought hezbollah into our sights for the first time, probably strengthened the iranian hand. >> if you want to live the life of policy failures by all means get involved in the middle east. >> i believe that the reagan policy in the middle east wasted the power of american leadership and diplomacy. >> much of the problems that we have till this day in the region were born out of policies that either were you the into place during reagan or were continued during the reagan years. >> that was a clip from the documentary series, the reagan presidency coming to pbs.
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with us now the filmmaker behind the project, chip duncan. howard dean, katty kay all back with us. that's a fascinating introduction to a documentary, mobilely focused on reagan's foreign policy as it pertains to the soviet union and prevailing a 50-year cold war. >> yeah, in this case, it was all based on a comment from george schulze during our interview with schulze who said, and i'm more or less quoting that he felt that the reagan administration didn't make a lot of accomplishments in the middle east but at least things didn't go backwards. we decided to explore the notion of whether things actually went backwards. >> it's interesting that reagan as he was leaving the oval office, pat buchanan had said reagan leaving the oval office turned around and looked back right as george h.w. bush is being sworn in and went back to that day in lebanon and said that was the one day that he wished he could have had back.
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that was the low point of his remarkable presidency. >> well, yeah, and you're referring to the embassy or either the embassy bombing or the marine corps barracks bombing. >> the marine corps barracks. >> we get into a fairly serious way the birth of hezbollah in this film largely based on the kind of power vacuum that occurred around the u.s. pullout from lebanon. >> you know what is surprising when you look back in history's rearview mirror and it's not that long ago, the beirut bombing, the mayor corps barracks bombing and compare it what happened in the news cycle with length gaz zi. hundreds of marines killed and the reagan presidency not only survived but depending on your point of view prospered. >> well, it certainly is interesting to compare those two. i mean the death toll alone are
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hugely different but it was the security issues around the barracks bombing that i think that mcfarland and others came to regret. that led to the u.s. pullout from lebanon. that's where the power vacuum begins. >> talk about the power vacuum. reagan also, after lebanon, was far, far more careful about using force globally. and most, really most of his success in foreign policy didn't come in any hot wars. it automobile came in the cold wars, what he did at reykjavik, what he did at peace talks. did you find that reagan learned from the terrible mistakes of lebanon and it made him far less likely to use force moving forward. >> i think we explore that to some extent and find he was generally opposed to using force. it was a rel livety, you know, in terms of military intervention a fairly peaceful
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period. the cold war is a whole other story. he used a lot of economic warfare in that. mcfarland in the film gets into sdi and how that was used to try and break the back of the soviet economy so. >> can we talk about that quickly? sdi, which democrats dismissed, ted kennedy famously in the early '80s called it star wars. reagan was roundly mocked for years. what a great irony it ended up being this program that may not have even been able to be used successfully. but brought gorbachev back to the table after achia vick. how important was that card that he played, even when some in his own country were skeptical about its use? >> well, i think it had a pretty significant impact and reykjavik is the best example of it, although we include a lot of soviet scholars in the film. a number of them talk about the fact that gorbachev paid the
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dysition to ignore sdi and act as if it didn't exist. the soviet union had a whole lot of other problems because sdi. their war in afghanistan was incredibly draining on their economy. so a lot was going to happen in the soviet union with or without reagan. >> accounty kay? >> did you find when you were looking at the film, i'm thinking about the middle east side of things and the criticisms might have set the clock back. how much influence could reagan have had in the middle east during the $1980? we look at the american situation today with the middle east in turmoil and america's power is somewhat limited. was reagan in a very different position back then? >> i think he did have a lot of influence but maybe could have had more had he changed the relationship between the u.s. and israel at that time. one of the things that we explore in the film is the war in lebanon in a fairly significant way. you get into the back story on what was happening between the plo and the israelis at the
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time. and we explore an event called the -- it's referred to as the massacres at sabra and, two refugee camps in bay ru which leads to the kahan commission in israel. reagan and begin had a fairly cold relationship at that point. >> that was my question. reagan is lionized because of the outcome of the cold war. he had great partner. gorbachev was one of the premiere statesman of the last century. he had no problem in the middle east. they could never get the right partner at the right time. reagan in his defense had nobody to talk to essentially in the middle east that wanted to move the agenda forward. >> i would say outside of the saudi government, yes, that's true. and that relationship between reagan and begin once it went cold had enormous impact. once we pulled out of lebanon, then what? you see the repercussions play out over 30 years. this is a very different film than something we would have made pre- 9/11.
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>> in addition to a great partner in gorbachev, isn't part of what happened to the demise of the cold war partially the fact that we had a bigger credit card than the russians did? we just outspent them in terms of munitions, in terms of military buildup. >> well, it's interesting you say that. among the people we interviewed in the film, robert reisch makes the comment that the military spending was canescyian economics at its best. >> there you go. and then doug brinkley who is in the film basically says yep, and that's true and reagan was a big believer in that. >> cap wine burger. >> yeah, the military spending, i mean, there were so many things at play in the kind of end of the cold war, but certainly american spending was a significant factor. >> chip, can i ask you a domestic question about that. if ronald reagan was right now in congress, where in the republican party would he be? >> well, you know, if you
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believe jeb bush and others who have made a tour out of that talking point, i would say he certainly would appear to be moderate by tea party standards. his presidency -- and i should mention this, we divide the film between domestic and foreign policy. on the doe pes tick side when you look at tax reduction, tax increase, tax reform, immigration, he comes off looking like a moderate. >> chip, let me ask you in closing, i just want to clarify one thing here. >> sure. >> you have said a couple of times that hezbollah was created out of the void left when reagan took our troops out of lebanon. is there a suggestion by any of the scholars that you -- that you talked to that reagan should have stayed in lebanon longer? was that the flaw that many people said caused problems in the middle east that after the attack, after the killings, that reagan did decide to bring the troops loam? >> depending on how deeply you
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want to go into the middle east policy, i would say, if you talk to rez za as you land and some other scholars, there are a number of things going on relative to iran, but certainly as it relates to george schulze and rondy rice in the film, they all say yes, that the pullout created a power vacuum that led to at least to the strength of hezbollah from that point forward. so they would all say they regret that decision. >> to what extent do you think they didn't understand what they were getting into? to send troops into an area where there are 15 interest groups all of whom are armed is a lot like afghanistan. >> that's a good point. i don't think they actually knew because they certainly didn't understand what the long-term consequences were going to be. >> we're looking back, too, in fairness, 35 years later. you've got to put this in perspective. it was only 1979 that not only jimmy carter but all of america and the western world was shocked by the return of
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ayatollah ali khomeini from paris to iran. we never saw ta coming. we had no idea what was happening. a couple years later, this attack happens in lebanon, not just reagan but democrats and republicans alike were sitting there obsessing over complex nuclear weapon systems, and it ends up you know, that it's a car bomb that causes the greatest death in reagan's presidency. i think howard brings up a great point. i don't think anybody had any idea what we were getting into in the middle east, not in '79, not in '83. >> you know, one of the things i've been saying to audiences when i talk to them is that one of the -- one of my lessons in in process is realizing the complexities of the president and all the things they cannot anticipate. they come in with an ideology but then events happen, whether it's carter or reagan. you can't anticipate a lot of this. >> thanks so much for being with us, chip. greatly. now playing in markets all over
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the country. check your local listings. chip duncan, thanks again. dave barry joins us next for his new neville "insane city." keep it right here on "morning joe." i have lost 101 lbs on weight watchers online. i just got started and i'm like "hey, that first 20 came off, well it wasn't too hard at all." i love breads. you can still eat bread. i love my sweets. i can still have a cookie on weight watchers. i love the barcode scanner. occasionally, i'll use it at the bar. of course! that's what it's for, right? bar code. oh i think i'm never going there again. i feel healthy. and just...young again. [ female announcer ] weight watchers online. the power of weight watchers completely online. join for free today.
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dave barry a pulitzer prize-winning author whose books on life were adapted to tv in the sit-com "dave's world." the show started a young actor nayed pratt pick war burton. with a tivo premiere dvr, you can see both sit-coms in a few clicks. >> i believe that. i believe that. >> and he's here now. but lister priz-winning columnist dave barry. let me tell you and you can attest to this now too, the hardest thing in life to do if you write for a living is to be funny in print. this guy did it every time out of the box. >> that's druggs. >> i don't represented them for young people. >> now you're tweeting, right? >> i do tweet. doesn't everyone tweet now? >> you prefer it to column writing? >> no, i'm not a regular. i was on the campaign trail this year briefly. i went to the convention.
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i discovered that pretty much political report has now become tweeting now. there's a lot of tweeting going on polling and tweeting, tweeting and polling. >> tweeting about polls. >> those two things, you could be a political. >> sam had a big career tweeting about polls. >> that's all i do. so many of the polls are long. >> do you ever take polls will the tweets or is that going too far. >> yeah, we've done that. >> what i want to know who have you been speaking to? we're going to talking about your 38th book. >> 38th book which is by the way for sale. >> isn't somebody supposed do this at this point? >> it's for sale. >> 38 books. >> all you do, you give the money and they'll give you the book or mail me the money directly. >> who have you been speaking to when you refer to us as the most electic crew? >> i've been on a lot of book tours. this group, this particular group, howard dean talked to me about my book which has like
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snakes and orangutans have you covered here on "morning joe" the python challenge now going on? >> yes, i saw that. >> we have the most insane -- we have all these pythons. >> eaten by pythons. >> they're taking over the evergla everglades. some of them are actually now in miami city commission. that's our -- but they're taking over. so our solution in florida because i guess people don't think we're already weird enough as a state is to invite people from everywhere to come and kill our pythons. come on down and kill our pyt n pythons. that's the florida state motto now. >> there was a piece i believe in the "new york times" about this last week about people driving from all over america to come and kill pythons. >> but we have rules. the fish and wildlife conservation commission has strict rules. you have to kill them humanly. right. you can't just cut off the head
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according to the fish and wildlife because the pythons brain stays alive and they can -- and if i understand the rules correctly, you have to destroy the brain to keep the head of the python everyone suffering. i don't think the people running around the everglades will be all that concerned about that. . but that is the rules. >> have you seen pictures of these guys doing all the shooting? a lot of them are in camos in case the python sees them. >> the python will not recognize them wearing camo. >> they have 100,000 pythons and they killed 25 so far. the other problem is, they're not really getting that many. we may have to resort to like drones or -- so dave, tell us about your book. >> it's a wacky novel full of sex. no, my book -- everybody hold up mine. it's called "insane city." it's about a wedding in miami and it basically is two of the
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more -- the insane part, weddings are, people are crazy. not really people. the bride and her mom go completely crazy. so it's a wedding set up in miami where everything goes wrong because it's in miami. and among other things, the groom loses the ring which ends up in the possession of an orangutan. that's really what -- because i know you guys were talking about illegal immigration, immigration. one of the problems the groom has in this book is he understand up with a family of haitians living in his hotel suite which becomes kind of -- it interferes with his wedding. you have to decide whether he's going to do the right thing or the wrong thing. >> can i ask you a florida question? >> sure. >> you said you went to the conventions. what's the deal with tampa? like why do people live there? >> well, when you were there, none of them were there because of the streets were like full of this giant armed camp. >> post an pock liptical.
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>> it was terrible. i don't know what they were thinking holding a convention florida in august. i don't know what the thinking was to begin with. not a bright thing to do. i don't think florida should be allowed to have anything to do with the elections in general. we don't do it well. we -- we, this is true, people still voting in line to vote in miami after president obama had already declared that he won and they were still waiting. i don't think we should be allowed to vote. i think they should -- unless we have 27 electoral votes, we should give them to a responsible state like wyoming which seems to be able to carry off an election. >> give them to vermont. >> vermont. or belgium. >> use them responsibly. anybody can have them. microsoft. >> we have for you as a gift. >> what. >> one of your recent tweets. >> i'm at a justin bieber concert with my daughter. please kill me now.
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it doesn't even have to be humanely. >> i took my daughters to the concert and i'm just now getting -- it was saturday night. i'm just now getting my hearing back. it's the loudest thing. there was a girl this far away from me on the other side of me from my daughter who for two solid hours just went i love you right in my ear. it wasn't me she was talking to. it was justin who was over there. you know? he's very cute. he does this. you want to know why teenage girls love him? pretend these are dark sun gases. >> that will get you. >> that would do it. >> that was good for like two solid minutes of screaming. >> that would do it. >> he didn't have to do anything es, just take off his sunglasses. >> the novel is "insane city," dave barry one of the greats. thanks, dave. >> put this over our head? >> just for the rest of the show, just talk behind the book. >> coming up across the river, brian sullivan with business headlines.
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we'll be back in a minute. peter and the star catchers based on dave barry's children novel is being adapted to the silver screen with gary ross as the director. ross has recently enjoyed success at the box office directing "seabiscuit" and the hunger games". if you hadtive vo premiere, could you have access to all of these titles at a moment's notice. put it all at your fingertips, brought to you by tivo. we're all having such a great year in the gulf,
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how lucky are we that we now have cnbc's brian sullivan with us to talk about the markets? and all i can say is yahoo!. get it? >> and barnicle, i'm not -- i'm here to talk about the markets. i don't know what the mukets are but i'll do my best. all right, yahoo!. yahoo! was getting all my attention this morning till another story came out of france of all places which i'm going to hit in a moment which is garnering more attention now. first off to yahoo!. marisa myers first full quarter as ceo coming in pretty solid aenks. beating the street. ad revenue rose 4%. they've got a search deal now with microsoft. and actually, that seems to be paying it dividends. maier also saying they're going to continue to go after google in search. they are not giving up. google dominates the search market but yahoo! has not given
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up. yahoo! on the offensive. speaking of offensive, okay, there's a guy by the name of michelle satanne. the finance minister of france, okay? could you imagine if tim geithner seemingly went on a radio show and said the united states was bankrupt? this is what he did in a radio interview in france. he called france "totally bankrupt." the president francoise holland did not authorize him to say it. me thinks that guy is in le grande trouble with. >> was he talking about economically, culturally. >> he was talking about taxes and capital. they've jacked up to 75% although a french high court said that may not be constitutional. jird depardieu of the plane incident as well as others saying they're going to leave the country. a couple high rollers but really
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high taxes, a fear of a capital flight. can you imagine if geithner or jack lew went on and said "america's totally wrupt"? that's what happened in france yesterday. mind blowing. sacre broke. >> good luck for his job security. >> thanks very much for talking about the mahkets. >> it was a wicked good hit. >> there you go. i won't do it. my career would be over. we have a big show coming up tomorrow. al gore and bill gates will be here. unbelievable. up next, the best of late night.
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>> the according to government run news outlets last week the iranian government successfully launched a live monkey into space. there's been no independent confirmation of the launching which means it probably didn't happen but they did release a photo. this is the alleged iranian space monkey. based on the photograph i'm guessing he didn't volunteer for the mission. but by the way, i like to have seen them hook the monkey up with the ikea sweater monkey. wouldn't they make a great
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couple? they claimed the monkey traveled more than 75 miles into space and returned to earth alive and well. they threw him a parade when he got back. there's the space monkey. yeah, that's him. adorable when he bangs his little cymbals together. very cute. >> and do you remember that show the monkeys that used to talk back in the day on after the monkeys? >> i'm trying to remember the name. >> that monkey might be a good reality show. i do feel bad for it. a car plunged into a frozen pond with two people in it. >> why did you want to do this together, a joint interview? >>. ♪
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. >> thank you very much. >> all right. >> that was a little awkward, wasn't it? >> funny stuff. funny stuff. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? ♪ [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪
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[ engine revs ] ♪
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Morning Joe
MSNBC January 29, 2013 3:00am-6:00am PST

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

TOPIC FREQUENCY Washington 23, Us 17, Clinton 17, America 16, Marco Rubio 12, Joe Biden 11, Lebanon 10, John Mccain 9, Chuck Schumer 8, Steve Rattner 8, Joe 8, New York 8, Sam Stein 8, Willie Geist 7, Dave Barry 7, Florida 7, Biden 6, Willie 6, Sam 6, Tom Daschle 6
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